Oakland librarian collects ephemera left behind


guardiancats:

image

For decades librarians at Oakland’s main library have collected the scraps of paper ephemera left behind in returned books, shoved into nooks in the library shelves or secretly slipped to librarians.

The collection ranges from half-done to-do lists to childish notes about gossip and crushes…

(via kellymce)

bookstorey:

Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling


Just So Stories for Little Children, which includes tales such as How the Camel got his Hump and How the Leopard got his Spots, is Rudyard Kipling’s (1865-1936) fantastical take on Darwinian evolution and remains among the most loved of his work.


The stories also had a deeply personal resonance for Kipling: as they were originally invented for the entertainment of his own children and those of his friends. Throughout the stories Kipling addresses the reader as ‘Best Beloved.’ This is more than just an attempt to bring a sense of intimacy; it is an allusion to his daughter Josephine who died at the age of six, just a few years before the stories were published.


The book was originally published in 1902 with Kipling’s self-drawn black and white illustrations. In 1912 colour illustrations by Joseph M. Gleeson were added. Kipling’s cover design includes the ancient Hindu good luck symbol, which is often mistaken for a Nazi swastika.


For further book scraps, please follow on Twitter.

schoollibraryjournal:

 

"Advocacy for Animals Ignored by Children’s Books." Yes, the poster is available. #bea14 (via Fusenews: The Bear grumbleth “mum mum” — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production)

schoollibraryjournal:

 

"Advocacy for Animals Ignored by Children’s Books." Yes, the poster is available. #bea14
(via Fusenews: The Bear grumbleth “mum mum” — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production)

MANGA JIMAN COMPETITION 2014 http://ift.tt/1l2u1XT

MANGA JIMAN COMPETITION 2014 http://ift.tt/1l2u1XT


by liivelyy:
Library Levitation on Flickr.
booksdirect:

Hot chocolate and a good book.

booksdirect:

Hot chocolate and a good book.

explore-blog:

For Marilyn Monroe's birthday, Open Culture digs up this wonderful photo of her reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass – another manifestation of Monroe’s little-known literary side, best embodied in her unpublished poems and penchant for Ulysses.

explore-blog:

For Marilyn Monroe's birthday, Open Culture digs up this wonderful photo of her reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass – another manifestation of Monroe’s little-known literary side, best embodied in her unpublished poems and penchant for Ulysses.

(Source: explore-blog)

teachingliteracy:

worclip:

Calendar — Pop-Up Poem Book by Éva Somogyi

This 3D poem-book created by pop-up technique was inspired by the twentieth-century Hungarian poet Miklós Radnóti’s lyrical cycle titled Calendar. The spatial compositions in the twelve spreads are linked to the main theme – the changes in nature with the seasons of the year. The whole cycle is about the changes and movements take place in nature. The small paper creations reflect the atmosphere and cyclical nature of the seasons in a clear but lyric and sensitive way – as the poems it selves do. Except in case of the typography I consciously used no colours but accidental lights, shadows and contrasts in order to create a smooth harmony of colours.

jedavu:

PROVOCATIVE STREET MESSAGES BY MOBSTER

(via bookoisseur)

teachingliteracy:

shelfie by nonhoration

Love me a shelfie!

teachingliteracy:

shelfie by nonhoration

Love me a shelfie!

“Part of the power of comics is that they enter our lives early, before we can form any biases against them. Like many kids, Spiegelman learned to decipher the images of Batman before he could read. For immigrant children in particular, comics can provide a road map of a new culture that isn’t available at home. Just as Mouly would one day improve her English via Arcade, the young Spiegelman got a guided tour of American popular culture through Mad magazine.”